Labor yet to set interim emissions target

Labor supports a net zero target by 2050, but it will set a interim target before the next election.
Labor supports a net zero target by 2050, but it will set a interim target before the next election.

While the Morrison government is under pressure to deliver a plan for net zero emissions by 2050 before the world descends on Glasgow to talk climate change, Labor has yet to confirm what it's interim target would be.

The Business Council of Australia, which represents the nation's biggest companies, released an analysis on Saturday calling for a 50 per cent emissions reduction by 2030.

It says a cut of between 46 and 50 per cent on 2005 levels within the decade is pragmatic, ambitious and will drive investment.

"It's fantastic that we now have every state and territory, all the major business groups agreeing with Labor that you can reduce emissions, grow jobs and grow the economy," Labor frontbencher Tanya Plibersek told Sky News' Sunday Agenda program.

Labor supports a net zero target by 2050, but says it will set a interim target before the next federal election, which is due by May.

"We are looking very closely what happens in Glasgow," Ms Plibersek said.

"This is an opportunity for the world to do something really significant to bring down pollution but also invest in a clean energy future that brings with it prosperity and jobs."

Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who is in negotiations with its coalition Nationals partner on a 2050 target, has yet to confirm whether he will attend the United Nations climate change conference later this month.

"It's pretty extraordinary not to take the opportunity to be at the table when these huge decisions are being made. It makes sense to me that Australia would be represented at the highest level at something like this," Ms Plibersek said.

Mr Morrison, still in isolation after his last overseas trip, is reluctant to spend yet another 14 days in quarantine on a return from Scotland.

NSW Environment Minister and new state treasurer Matt Kean was asked on Sky News whether his government would consider reducing Mr Morrison's isolation to seven days.

"I think that this is such an important issue, I think the community would expect that governments would work together to ensure that we are able to represent out interests on the world stage," he said.

"I'm confident that we can work through these issues."

Australian Associated Press