Tim Oliver tackles the ultimate test

Hard yakka: Tim Oliver recently competed in one of the toughest fitness tests in America and finished fifth! The event ran for 36-hours non-stop on a farm in Cuba, Illinois.
Hard yakka: Tim Oliver recently competed in one of the toughest fitness tests in America and finished fifth! The event ran for 36-hours non-stop on a farm in Cuba, Illinois.

Picture this. It's 35-hours into a grueling non-stop 36-hour event fitness examination of the mind and body.

A combination of farm chores and military-style training have rendered your body almost useless.

Pain has replaced where your muscles are meant to be. Fatigue is your new best friend.

And just then, on a farm in Cuba, Illinois, the organisers of one of the toughest fitness tests in America reveal the next challenge: 200-metres of burpee jumps.

That's what faced Tim Oliver recently.

Oliver, who is a personal trainer and owner of F45 at Prestons, finished fifth in the event called the Ultimate Suck.

The 24-year-old is a regular on the fitness event circuit finishing fourth in the 2016 World's Toughest Mudder and 11th at the World Champs for 24-hour obstacle course racing earlier this year.

So what drives him to push his body to the extreme?

"I like pushing my limits and seeing how much more my body is capable of doing then I initially think it is and just seeing how far I can push myself to the next level with it all," he said.

"I just love just the challenge of something that's close to impossible to try and see how far you can go with it.

"One thing about this event is you didn't know what was next. You'll get given a task to do which might be a five kilometre run or it might be a five kilometre heavy pack carry and you might be carrying 30 kilos on your back, and then you don't know what's next until you finish that task."

Usually what came next was tough. He totaled about 100 kilometers in distance and a lot of that distance was carrying at least 24-kilograms.

Then there was the eight-hour river hike, shooting challenges and the farm tasks like carrying two- 24 kilogram buckets.

The Bossley Park resident had his daily F45 style training to fall back on. He also does a lot of ultra running and occasionally with a sandbag on his back to build what he calls "functional fitness" which helps him keep going for long periods of time.

But then came the 200-metres of burpee jumps.

"I was feeling pretty terrible by that point. Lower back was gone, my stomach was feeling pretty rubbish from lack of food and energy and you haven't slept for 40-hours on top of that so at the same time you are fatigued and legs are starting to give way," he said.

"I was feeling sick and it was just a matter of pushing through and just doing one at a time and just trying to get through it.

"The biggest thing that I found and the thing that kept me going was just taking the one task at a time and just focusing solely on going that next step, going that next kilometre and avoiding thinking about the fact that you still had 12-hours in front of you or 24-hours at one point.

"My focus was let's just get one more burpee done or one more push up and soon each one adds up and you get there."

Oliver's main focus now is training for the modern pentathlon across five different sports: fencing, swimming, equestrian show jumping, pistol shooting and cross-country running.