QUEEN'S HONOURS | Casula firefighter Phil Lindsay recognised for improving culture

MEDAL: Chief Superintendent Phil Lindsay, of Casula. "He's helped increase the number of Indigenous firefighters in NSW," Commissioner Paul Baxter said.
MEDAL: Chief Superintendent Phil Lindsay, of Casula. "He's helped increase the number of Indigenous firefighters in NSW," Commissioner Paul Baxter said.

A Casula fire officer's 34-year commitment to protecting people and supporting the careers of Indigenous firefighters was recognised in the Queen's Honours. Chief Superintendent PhilLindsay was awarded the Australian Fire Service medal, the highest honour an Australian firefighter can get.

Fire & Rescue NSW Commissioner PaulBaxter said: "Chief Superintendent Lindsay has demonstrated the highest commitment to the safety and wellbeing of his fellow firefighters and has achieved many important cultural improvements."

Starting with FRNSW in 1985, he made a vital contribution to community safety in the South-West where he served first as a duty commander and then as a zone commander for five years.

Since 2017, he's been responsible for FRNSW's Operational Communications team and has overseen significant culture improvements through greater engagement with staff and a strong focus on safety and wellbeing.

He's been driving the Indigenous Fire & Rescue Employment Strategy.

"Thanks to Chief Superintendent Lindsay's leadership, the IFARES program has increased the number of indigenous firefighters in NSW and helped foster a wider appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture in our organisation," the commissioner said.

"He's highly regarded by fellow firefighters for his knowledge and dedication to helping others."

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