Wild start to snake season

Snake season starts: A snake which was recently caught in netting at a property in Austral. Picture: Kane Durrant
Snake season starts: A snake which was recently caught in netting at a property in Austral. Picture: Kane Durrant

A wildlife worker has confirmed snake season has kicked off after a rise of concerning reports from Liverpool residents this month. 

Business owner of Wild Snake Catchers, Kane Durrant, said there’s only been a couple of warm days so far but snakes have already entered out of hibernation to look for food and mating partners. 

“This October I’ve already been called to five homes around Liverpool and I get called to other regions, such as the Blue Mountains,” Mr Durrant said.

“I received a call at 3pm from a resident there who found a five-foot diamond python inside his home. It was his dogs that alerted him.

“He didn’t want to wait an hour or so for me to drive there so I put him in contact with someone closer.”

Residents beware: Snake catcher Kane Durrant said more snakes will be out as the weather becomes warmer. Picture: Rachael Durrant

Residents beware: Snake catcher Kane Durrant said more snakes will be out as the weather becomes warmer. Picture: Rachael Durrant

He said some suburbs where snakes are more likely to be seen include Chipping Norton, Wattle Grove, Holsworthy, Voyager Point, Hammondville, Prestons and Austral.

“Land close to rivers and creeks are hot spots. Some of the more common snakes in Liverpool are red-bellied black snakes and eastern brown snakes but last year I helped remove a diamond python from a home at Chipping Norton.

“People will see an increase in snake activity until Christmas but it will continue until May. My message is to be aware and keep backyards tidy so it doesn’t attract vermin that snakes feed on.

“If you do find one don’t approach it, call a professional snake catcher. Snake catchers have to be licensed and fully insured.”

Mr Durrant has been catching snakes since the mere age of 14 and is aware of the risks associated with amateur snake catching. 

“When people are bitten it’s usually when they try to trap, catch, hit or kill snakes. Most of the time the snake will bite the hand and if it’s a venomous snake it can be fatal.

“I’ve been bitten before but at least I knew what to do and I applied first aid to myself. 

“If someone in the public was to get bitten the best thing is to apply a pressure-immobilisation bandage, to remain calm and then dial triple zero (000). Those steps will help to save people. We to have a very effective healthcare system and anti-venom available.”

Another tip he has is to remove children and pets from the site where a snake is located.

He was recently told about an incident where a woman’s dogs were bitten as they attacked a snake.

“The two dogs decided to play tug-of-war with a red belly black snake at a home in Horningsea Park and it bit them. We don’t want wildlife killed so it was unfortunate the snake died, but it’s lethal for dogs and humans.

“I’m not sure on what the dogs status is now but last I heard they were being treated at the vet with anti-venom and so fourth.”

His final warning was about clearing land.

“Netting used to keep produce fresh can catch snakes. I was called to an address at Austral and gave advice to the resident about making her backyard more snake-friendly so it didn’t happen again.

“Snakes can become more aggressive when they’re caught in netting because they feel trapped.”

  • DETAILS: If you are concerned about a snake you can contact Wild Snake Catchers on 0414 089 920.

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