Liverpool welcome 15 eager police recruits

Eager to start: The group were part of Class 333 which includes 164 policemen and 70 policewomen who are set to complete 12-months of on-the-job training while studying an Associate Degree in Policing Practice.
Eager to start: The group were part of Class 333 which includes 164 policemen and 70 policewomen who are set to complete 12-months of on-the-job training while studying an Associate Degree in Policing Practice.

A group of 15 police recruits who’ve just graduated from an intense 9-months’ training at the Police Academy were welcomed to Liverpool police station last Monday.

The group were part of Class 333 – 164 policemen and 70 policewomen who are set to complete 12 months’ on-the-job training while studying for an Associate Degree in Policing Practice before being ranked as constables.

A couple of Liverpool recruits shared their hopes and dreams, including Hinchinbrook identical twins Marc and Nathan Brown. “You could say we’re inseparable. We took different paths at the end of high school. Nathan did a trade, I did accounting. But I got bored and wanted to do something to help people and something different each day. This is what I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid and it’s definitely a lot more interesting than spreadsheets!” said older twin Marc. “We made the change at the same time but they split us up with me at Liverpool and Nathan at Green Valley. We still might end up together eventually. It’ll be good fun!”

Marc’s background in martial arts inspired him to choose a career where he could be more active. He’s looking forward to tackling community problems such as domestic violence and drugs. “I’m over-the-moon about starting here.” 

Brother Nathan, 24, hopes they get to work together. "That was the plan. It ‘d be fun to see the reactions. We know each other and how we react to things. But we’re also pretty competitive – especially at the academy. They kept us apart when they could and it was probably best.”

Nathan has a background in rugby and hopes to work with disadvantaged youth.

Another recruit is Camden resident Clare Leone, 25. Instead of working in general duties for a three-year probationary period after 18-months she’ll transfer to forensics. “I was constantly changing my mind and then uni started and I really loved science and not doing the same thing each day. Whereas with other scientific jobs you’re often stuck in a lab all day. I’ll still be in the NSW Police Force. I’ll be specialising in fingerprinting at Parramatta. I found it really fascinating – not one person has the same fingerprints. To be able to pursue that as a career is really interesting.”

One recruit who began policing a little later is Prestons’ Timothy Proctor, 28: “I wanted to be a firefighter and volunteered for a while but it’s extremely selective and that made me look at alternatives. I worked in IT as a laptop repairer but it was limiting and so I pursued policing. When growing up I noticed the bad perception of police due to corruption. I want to change that. I believe growing up here I have a good understanding of the cultural groups, too.”

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