Amity College celebrate cultural diversity

The day explored Myanmar, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Monaco, Libya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Mexico, Guatemala, Barbados, Canada, Ecuador and Greece.
The day explored Myanmar, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Monaco, Libya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Mexico, Guatemala, Barbados, Canada, Ecuador and Greece.

Amity College GHS Prestons celebrated the world by hosting a Quad Fiesta day to display 12 cultures through cuisine and entertainment.

The nations explored in the Quad Fiesta were drawn from a list of countries listed by United Nation as sovereign countries.

It included Myanmar, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Monaco, Libya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Mexico, Guatemala, Barbados, Canada, Ecuador and Greece.

Each year the school selects about 12 cultures and will soon cover every nation in the world to explore it’s history and culture.

One of the highlights of the annual event was the opportunity for pupils to mix with other schools. This year Amity College hosted four visiting schools from across NSW.

One of the year 9 pupils, Azhar Hamied came to Amity College in year 5 and has a Palestinian Arab background. 

She said her perception of Australia has dramatically changed since arriving.

Azhar Hamied.

Azhar Hamied.

“I was born in an Arabic country and my parents came as immigrants and when I came here I feared everyone else would be blonde and blue-eyed. But I was shocked to see people here from all these other countries and it’s important to know you’re accepted. When you go to a food court you can see the diversity in Australia.”

She said it was a bit of a cultural shock to witness other cultures dances, such as Samoan dance.

“I got goose-bumps from seeing the performances because they were so different to my own culture. Dances from the different schools were amazing, it allowed us to get a glimpse of other cultures. The dances were so different to my culture, such as Samoan.

“Sometimes we don’t realise what other cultures are like until we see it happen in front of our eyes. I feel like it was great – no school was left out. Even countries we hadn’t heard of before, for example Barbados.”

She said her year group also performed a poem they had formed together about what their cultural perception was of Australia.

“They wrote about how they feel Australia should be described. About a week before the day, the teacher showed us this poem about America and it described how America is multicultural but not in a sensible way. We looked at this example and got into groups who wrote a small poem and we put it all together.

“We usually say Australia is like a salad bowl but we decided to describe Australia as something more equal. The main thing is it’s not like a salad so we wanted to make it seem more diverse.”