Life-sized dino coming to town

First time in public: An 11-metre realistic Tyrannosaurus rex which has undergone an autopsy will make its public debut at Stockland Wetherill Park on February 27.

First time in public: An 11-metre realistic Tyrannosaurus rex which has undergone an autopsy will make its public debut at Stockland Wetherill Park on February 27.

Ever wondered what the skin of a dinosaur would feel like or how big it’s heart was? 

People of all ages, including the big-kids-at-heart, have the chance to get up close and personal with a life-sized Tyrannosaurus rex without the need for a time machine.

For two weeks only an ultra-realistic 11 metre long, three metre tall T-Rex model will be at Stockland Wetherill Park. Stockland has teamed up with the Australian Museam to exhibit the T-Rex at only five shopping centres in News South Wales.

Life-like: The model features removable internal organs, including heart, lungs, stomach, intestines.

Life-like: The model features removable internal organs, including heart, lungs, stomach, intestines.

The model, worth more than $600,000, is the world’s first anatomically complete creation of a T. rex, and was made in the United Kingdom for a National Geographic documentary, called T. rex Autopsy.

 Australian Museum's exhibitions manager Fran Dorey said the exhibition was not for the faint-hearted.

“The reason why we are showing it in shopping places is because they are one of the few places that can actually fit it – in its current state we can’t event get it in the museum,” she said.

“It is quite surreal as well because you know it is not a real animal but you sort of feel bad for it," Ms Dorey said.

“It is quite surreal as well because you know it is not a real animal but you sort of feel bad for it," Ms Dorey said.

“It is a really innovated way to get people interested in science. This is not a dry textbook, video or fossil –  this is a very lifelike model, with flesh and blood and everything. What you see is the dinosaur after the autopsy, so you can see the organs that have been cut out, the blood platters and the damage that caused it to supposedly die.

“It is quite surreal as well because you know it is not a real animal but you sort of feel bad for it.”

The display will be launched at Stockland Wetherill Park at 10am on Monday, February 27. 

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