Look beyond, without additives

Art Show: Female Muslim artists from around Australia at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre. Picture: Luke Fuda
Art Show: Female Muslim artists from around Australia at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre. Picture: Luke Fuda

THESE faces represent some of the talent behind the Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre's current exhibition, No Added Sugar.

The exhibition, which opened over the weekend, runs as part of the Sydney Writers Festival.

It is a joint project of the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Powerhouse and is aimed to bring awareness and cultural understanding about how Muslim women live, love and learn in Australia.

The exhibition's curator and artist, Rusaila Bazlamit, said this was the first time a project like this had been run on a national level.

She said Muslim female artists from Melbourne, Canberra and Brisbane joined their Sydney colleagues to produce works inspired and informed by community engagement. "The way Islam is represented in this project is not as a faith but rather as a part of the identity of these women," she said. "Being a Muslim only constitutes a part of their identity and I really want people to look beyond this and see them as talented individuals."

With confronting imagery of war, sculptures that tell the taboo tale of divorce in Islam and traditional henna art, visitors can expect to see a diverse range of works.

Mrs Bazlamit said the artists addressed their own methods of self-determination to introduce new languages, both visually and conceptually into their work. "The work is new and brave and raw and I think that's what is important about it," she said.

This exhibition will run for nine weeks, to July 8. The Powerhouse will run a program to highlight the exhibition each Sunday from 2pm to 5pm.

Details: casulapowerhouse.com/exhibitions

/no-added-sugar.