Elders play vital role in Liverpool's Sorry Day event

Sorry day event: Aboriginal elder Aunty Norma Shelly raises the flag. Picture: SImon Bennett

Sorry day event: Aboriginal elder Aunty Norma Shelly raises the flag. Picture: SImon Bennett

AUNTY Norma Shelley represented the Darug people at the Liverpool Council's Sorry Day event, on Monday.

The 85-year-old elder gave the Welcome to Country on behalf of local Aboriginal communities and acknowledged the traditional land owners.

Aunty Norma has lived in Liverpool for 36 years.

She said she was brought up in white society, but her mother would take her to visit family members in an Aboriginal community at Scone.

"She would take us up there in the school holidays," Aunty Norma said. "This is where we would learn about our culture."

Throughout her life Aunty Norma was a teacher, president of the Inner West University of the Third Age, justice of the peace and member of the Land Council and is now an Aboriginal elder.

She said that elders had a vital role in their community.

"Their decisions play an integral part in recognising, preserving, supporting and maintaining Aboriginal culture," Aunty Norma said.

"Supporting particularly younger members of our community.

"Australia is made of many different Aboriginal nations each having their own country, culture, language, beliefs and customs."

She said Sorry Day works towards a reconciliation and recognition of past injustices.

"Aboriginal people are spiritual beings and by addressing mind, body and spirit the process of healing and reconciliation can begin."

See our gallery of pictures from the day below:

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